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When employers in the public security services industy are considering employing a worker from another EU Member State, or indeed from a country outside the European Union, on a permanent or longer term basis, there are a number of important questions they will have to consider:
 

1) Does the worker need a visa/residence permit to legally work in the country and has he or she obtained the required documentation in line with current rules and regulations?

2) Does the worker require a work permit to be legally employed in the country, is there a role for the employer in obtaining this permit and, if so, where can this be applied for?

3) If the worker is not yet registered in the country for tax, health service and social security coverage, what is the role of the employer in ensuring the worker is covered in this regard?
 
4) Are the qualifications the worker may have obtained in another country comparable with domestic minimum qualification/training requirements?

5) Can qualifications obtained abroad be recognised and validated to meet domestic minimum requirements? If yes, which authority can issue such recognition/validation and if not, where can the worker obtain the minimum required qualifications to be able to work in the sector?

6) Workers in the private security service industry usually have to undergo a number of (background) checks to be able to be active in the sector (these may depend on the precise nature of the work). Are the checks the foreign worker has undergone in his or her home country (or last country of employment) comparable and who would have issued the relevant certification? Can such certification obtained abroad be transferred or does the worker have to undergo the required additional checks in this country?

7) If the job requires the carrying of weapons, what are the regulations/permits/licences regarding the carrying and use of weapons and training received in the worker's home country (or last country of employment) and are these comparable and/or valid? 

8) Does the worker's home country (or last country of employment) require him or her to have a licence to work in the private security services industry? What are the requirements of this licence, are they comparable and what does the worker have to do to obtain a licence in this country?

9) If membership of a professional body is required to work in the sector, has the worker obtained this membership?

10) What level of salary, benefits and terms and conditions of employment would the worker have come to expect from their home country and are these comparable?
 
This website is designed to help employers wishing to offer permanent or longer term employment to workers from another country to obtain the relevant information to answer the above 10 questions by accessing different country pages, depending on the nationality or last country of employment of the worker they are proposing to recruit. So, for example, in the case of an employer in Austria wishing to recruit a worker from Belgium, he or she would consult the following pages to answer the above questions:

Questions 1 and 2
: To ascertain whether the worker has the relevant permits to be legally resident and employed in Austria, consult the pages for Austria entitled "labour market entry rules".

Question 3
: If the employer is uncertain what he or she has to do to register a foreign worker for health, taxation and social security purposes, consult the pages for Austria entitled "social security/taxation rules".

Question 4
: To establish whether any qualifications obtained abroad are comparable to domestic minimum training/qualification requirements, consult the pages entitled "private security industry rules" under the heading training and qualification requirements for the worker's home country (or the country where he/she was last employed in the sector), in this example, the pages for Belgium.

Question 5
: To find out whether training obtained abroad can be validated at home and what the relevant authority is, check the training and qualifications requirements section of the employer's country, in this case Austria.

Question 6
: The same process applies to establish whether the checks passed by the worker at home (such as criminal records checks) are comparable with those of the employer's country, who will have issued relevant certificates (check pages for Belgium in this example under "private security industry rules") and whether fresh checks need to be carried out prior to employment (check pages for Austria).

Question 7
: To find out if weapons training and protocol would have been similar in the worker's home country (or most recent country of employment) check the relevant country page (in this case Belgium).

Question 8
: Most countries require workers in the private security services industry to carry a licence. However, the requirements to obtain this licence can differ. To find out what these are for the home country of the worker in our example, consult the pages for Belgium under "private security industry rules" professional licence and documentation. To establish whether a licence is nonetheless required from the employer's country, consult the pages for this country (in this case Austria).

Question 9
: Some countries require workers in the private security services industry to be members of a professional body. However, the requirements for membership can differ. To find out what these are for the home country of the worker in our example, consult the pages for Belgium under "private security industry rules" membership of professional body. To establish whether membership is nevertheless required in the employer's country, consult the pages for this country (in this case Austria).

Question 10
: To find out what the salary and benefit expectations of the worker might be from their home country, consult the pages for this country (in this case Belgium) in the Information for Employees section of the website, under the heading collective agreements.
 

 




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With the support of European Commission Directorate-General Employment, Social Affairs and Equal Opportunities

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